Tag Archives: stew

Red Deer

19 Aug

Red Deer (Cervus elaphus), one of the largest deer species, are held in captivity for a variety of reasons, including its meat, which is called venison. It is not generally harvested for human consumption on a large scale, though speciality restaurants seasonally offer venison, which is widely considered to be both flavourful and nutritious. Venison is higher in protein and lower in fat than either beef or chicken.

We had the chance of trying venison when travelling in northern Italy, more specifically on Cortina D’Ampezzo, at “Ristorante Lago Scin” (Via Lago Scin, 1 – Cortina D’Ampezzo/Italy).  The restaurant is beautifully located right at the lake from which its name is derived, a small body of water at 1,336 m of altitude, in the center of Belluno Dolomites, province of Veneto.

Lago Scin - Cortina D'Ampezzo/Veneto/Italy

Lago Scin - Cortina D'Ampezzo/Veneto/Italy

Ristorante Lago Scin - Cortina D'Ampezzo/Veneto/Italy

Ristorante Lago Scin - Cortina D'Ampezzo/Veneto/Italy

As you can see by the images, we reached the restaurant on a rather beautiful summer day, ideal for occupying one of the outdoor tables, what in fact we did.

Among the ordered dishes was the already mentioned Red Deer, which came as a nice dark stew with a beautiful yellow polenta (Spezzatini di cervo con polenta).  Polenta, as you may know, is made from boiled cornmeal, and along with tomatoes, constitutes one of the most amazing Latin American contributions to the Italian cuisine, if not to the whole world (if that is not borderless cooking then tell me what is).

Both, the deer and the polenta, where very nicely prepared by Chef Carlo, and even though venison retains a “gamy” or “wild” taste, considering it tends to have a finer texture and is leaner than beef, the overall experience was rather enjoyable.  Something to be remembered and, if possible, repeated.

"Spezzatini di cervo con polenta" from "Ristorante Lago Scin"

"Spezzatini di cervo con polenta" from "Ristorante Lago Scin"

Venison on Foodista

On a cast iron stove

7 Jul

One of my pleasures during the winter (and it’s winter here) is to cook on a cast iron stove we have in the kitchen.  My wife usually lights it up as soon as she wakes up, as it’s used both for cooking as well as for heating (yes, we have air conditioning too, but sorry, I can’t cook on it).  It’s very nice for cooking old recipes using not so tender ingredients, demanding long cooking times, and a cast iron pan.

Cast iron stove in my kitchen

Cast iron stove in my kitchen

Last weekend I prepared some beef ribs with manioc roots (the largest source of carbohydrates for human food in the world – yes, more than rice).  The best thing about this dish is the sauce, of course.  Small diced onions, garlic, tomatoes, red pepper, half a bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon, black pepper corns, salt to taste. Let the meat cook slowly for a couple of hours (be careful not to let the water dry out) and then add the manioc.  Cook for an additional hour and after sprinkling some fresh parsley on top you’re ready to go.  If possible eat the sauce with some Italian bread.

Beef ribs with manioc

Beef ribs with manioc

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